2019 Measles Cases and Outbreaks in US

Measles cases in the United States. 2019 Measles Cases and Outbreaks in US, From day 1 to April 19, 2019, About 626+ human cases of measles have been confirmed currently in 22 states in the United States. there is pure increase of 71 cases last week. This is the second-greatest number of cases in the history of U.S. 667 cases reported in 2014. 2019 confirmed case are likely surpass 2014 levels.

2019 Measles Cases and Outbreaks in US

Measles: A viral infection that’s serious for small children but is easily preventable by a vaccine.
Very rare
Fewer than 10 thousand cases per year (Nigeria)
Preventable by vaccine
Treatable by a medical professional
Requires a medical diagnosis
Lab tests or imaging often required
Spreads easily
Short-term: resolves within days to weeks
The disease spreads through the air by respiratory droplets produced from coughing or sneezing.
Measles symptoms don’t appear until 10 to 14 days after exposure. They include cough, runny nose, inflamed eyes, sore throat, fever and a red, blotchy skin rash.
There’s no treatment to get rid of an established measles infection, but over-the-counter fever reducers or vitamin A may help with symptoms.
Ages affected
0-2
Very rare
3-5
Very rare
6-13
Extremely rare
14-18
Extremely rare
19-40
Extremely rare
41-60
Extremely rare
60+
Extremely rare
How it spreads
By mother to baby by pregnancy, labor, or nursing.
By airborne respiratory droplets (coughs or sneezes).
By saliva (kissing or shared drinks).
By skin-to-skin contact (handshakes or hugs).
By touching a contaminated surface (blanket or doorknob)
2019 Measles Cases and Outbreaks in US

2019 Measles Cases and Outbreaks in US

The states that have reported cases to CDC are Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Texas, Tennessee, and Washington.

Read More: World top cities to retire in 2019

2016: 86

2017: 120

2018: 372

2019: 685 (as of April) (CDC)

Read More: 9 Simple Steps How to Introduce Yourself in an Interview

Spread of Measles
  • The majority of people that got measles were unvaccinated.
  • Measles is still common in many parts of the world including some countries in Europe, Asia, the Pacific, and Africa.
  • Travelers with measles continue to bring the disease into the U.S.
  • Measles can spread when it reaches a community in the U.S. where groups of people are unvaccinated.

Measles Outbreaks

In a given year, more measles cases can occur for any of the following reasons:

  • an increase in the number of travelers who get measles abroad and bring it into the U.S., and/or
  • further spread of measles in U.S. communities with pockets of unvaccinated people.